Skip to content →

Ownership, Rights, Christ Owns the World?

In a certain Christian Facebook group, the below comment was written:

FullSizeRender-1

This sounds pious, but it is highly misleading and wrongheaded. The debate over property rights is not a matter of whether a certain piece of property is owned by either us or God. Rather, conversations relating to property rights and property ownership refers to who has the legal authority– among men– to make decisions regarding the scarce resources in the world. Property is scarce and individuals each have different desires in mind for how to employ given resources. But we cannot all have our way. Thus, we need a way to determine who has the legal authority to make decisions.

As a solution to this, God has delegated authority to individual stewards and we are told that man has the freedom to use the property under his stewardship according to his or her own determination. We know this because it is wrong to steal, that is, to decide the use of a given resource without the authority of the owner. This does not imply, of course, that every decision regarding the use of that property is per se morally sound; but rather that despite its moral soundness or unsoundness, other men are not allowed to interfere in the use of the property in discordance with the wishes of the steward.

This is the foundation of civilization, for economy, for the furtherance of the world societies. Without property rights, without a clear determination of who owns what, there is only chaos and decivilization.

Property rights are therefore a wonderful gift to mankind.

Finally, man cannot give up his rights. This is a common mistake. He can choose not to exercise them, but they cannot be alienated from him because God created the rights as part of mankind’s nature. That is, these rights have been imputed to the human race, on an individual basis, and the only choice that man has is either to not exercise them for themselves (as in the commenters statement) or else completely ignore their existence in others (in the case of governments, criminals, etc.).

Ironically, in the comment above, it is the respect of rights that could immediately solve the problem of Christians dying. It is a turning away from the systemic breach of rights by thug groups and states, that could magnificently shift the sad situation into a more peaceful scenario.

Published in C.Jay Engel