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It’s okay to side with a secularist who is right over a Christian who is wrong

The essence of Christianity, as a philosophical system (which I believe to be the best definition of “religion”), is it’s commitment to truth. There are many possible propositions, too many to count. Most of them are false. The ones that are not false are true. All the true propositions gathered together are what the Christian refers to as God, who is, by definition truth itself. Literally, we worship the truth. This is impressive for a philosophical system. And yet so many critics assume Christians refuse to engage in rationality. Perhaps most Christians do. In which case most Christians are not very “Christian.”

The truth of something does not depend upon the human being speaking. One who is not a Christian can speak the proposition: “socialism cannot properly allocate scarce resources according to their most efficient ends.” And he speaks truly. And the Christian can respond: “socialism does not suffer from this predicament.” And he speaks falsely.

Far too many Christians, attempting to be pious and aware various strains of anti-religionism in quasi libertarian circles, dismiss the Christian libertarian as “getting his political theory from secularists.” But this is not an argument. For the alleged “Christian” political theory held by the accuser is itself wrong, regardless of whether it is self-labelled a Christian view.

The nature of the “two-kingdom” structure of this life allows for Christians to agree, and learn from, non-Christians commentary on various topics, including politics and economics. Much economics, especially in the Austrian tradition, is far better than historical sources from the theologians, irrespective to the great insight that theologians have offered in times past. The Christian world, with some glorious exceptions scattered about, have been routinely and devastatingly statist in these areas.

Is the secularist who takes the principle behind the 8th commandment to its logical conclusion to be ignored in preference for the Christian who all but ignores it?

I have often written on epistemological concerns, and how this relates to the recent two-kingdom debates. My view, perhaps shifting somewhat in its emphasis in recent months, is as follows: the philosophical system that is most consistent, based on the demands of logic (a priori reasoning), is certainly a Christian one. But this fact does not cause Christians to be right in every area simply by virtue of their adherence to gospel-related propositions. Christianity can account for, and has a better foundation for, the ethical and logical demands of Austro-libertarian.

But inasmuch as we discuss ideas farther down the line of reasoning than merely foundation, the secularist libertarian (properly defined) is more agreeable than the statist Christian. What the Reformed Libertarian does, it seems to me, is match a solid foundation with the most consistent political and economic theory in history. By foundation, I refer to the idea that the Christian system is able to provide the backdrop, the setting, for proper reasoning.

We must break free from the logically empty claim that the Christian himself is necessarily right. He is only right inasmuch as he perceives truth correctly. And the secularist may sometimes be right as well. If one assents to a true proposition (“it is wrong to steal”), it is only the thinker who reasons forward with proper logic that discovers true inferences. Whether he is a Christian or not.

For the record, most Christian “presuppositionalists,” (and I say this as a Clarkian) are absurdly bad logicians, political theorists, and economic thinkers as well. 

The secularist may have an improper foundation, but the Christian who does not properly use his foundation is no better off.

Published in C.Jay Engel